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Posts for tag: Nose

By MIDWEST ENT; EAR NOSE AND THROAT SPECIALISTS
April 03, 2018
Category: ENT Care
Tags: Nose   Nosebleed  

Learn more about nosebleeds, why they happen and how you can handle them the next time they happen to you.

It can be rather startling when you notice blood dripping from your nose. While most people will experience a nosebleed at some point in You may need to seek medical treatment for nosebleedstheir lifetime, they are often most common in children and adults between the ages of 50 to 80 years old. Of course, where the bleeding is coming from will tell us what kind of nosebleed it actually is.

What is an anterior nosebleed?

The majority of nosebleeds start at the septum, which is the wall that separates your nostrils. The septum is full of blood vessels, which can easily be broken just by simple everyday habits like blowing your nose. If a blood vessel bursts in the nose this leads to a nosebleed. An anterior nosebleed occurs in the front of the nose and is characterized by bleeding from one nostril (this is the most common type of nosebleed).

Why do they happen?

An anterior nosebleed is most common during the dry winter months, particularly if you have indoor heating, as it can dry out the nasal passages. Those who live in dry environments are also more prone to nosebleeds. If you find that these drier climates do increase your risk of nosebleeds you can always apply a small amount of petroleum jelly onto a Q-tip and carefully apply it to the inside of the nose and the septum to keep the nasal membranes hydrated.

Is there a way to stop an anterior nosebleed?

If you experience a nosebleed you may feel a bit panicked but it’s nothing to worry about. They often go away on their own but there are certainly things you can do to help reduce or even stop your nosebleed.

When to seek medical attention?

Most nosebleeds aren’t serious and won’t require care; however, if the bleeding is severe or the result of an injury, if the bleeding hasn’t stopped after following the steps above, or if you are experiencing other symptoms like chest pain then you need to get medical care as soon as possible.

What can I do to stop the bleeding?

The first thing you will want to do is sit up and lean forward so the blood won’t drain into the throat. Blow your nose to remove any clots that may have developed. While you may have heard to apply pressure to the bridge of the nose to stop bleeding, this actually won’t stop a nosebleed. Instead, pinch the soft parts of the nose, on both sides, to help lessen the bleeding.

If you are someone who suffers from frequent nosebleeds there might be a problem, so it’s better to play it safe rather than sorry and contact our otolaryngologist right away. We want to help put a stop to your nosebleeds!

By MIDWEST ENT; EAR NOSE AND THROAT SPECIALISTS
December 01, 2017
Category: ENT Health
Tags: Allergies   Nose  

Dander is a common allergen made up of tiny flakes and particles of skin from common household pets like cats, dogs, birds and rodents. Dander is harmless to adults and children who do not suffer from allergies, however people who sneeze and become congested around certain animals might be allergic. Pet allergies can range from mild to severe, with treatment options ranging from over the counterPet dander can cause allergy-like symptoms antihistamines, to prescription medication from an ear, nose and throat (ENT) doctor.

What You Need to Know About Dander and Pet Allergies

In addition to their skin, fur and feathers, animals like cats and dogs can also trigger allergic reactions in humans through proteins found in their saliva, urine and dried feces. So even the owner of a short haired or hairless cat may still experience an allergic reaction while cleaning out the cat litter or removing soiled newspaper from a dog's crate. Although many domestic animal breeds are marketed as non-allergenic alternatives, ENT specialists advise highly allergic adults or parents of children with allergies to exercise caution, given that allergens are not exclusive to fur and can still be found in the pet's saliva, regardless of their coat.

A few facts about dander and pet allergens according to the American Lung Association:

  • Americans are more than twice as likely to report allergies to cats than to dogs
  • Female cats produce more of the protein (Fel d I) associated with cat allergies in humans
  • Pet allergens tend to remain airborne longer than dust mites and other sources, and can remain in the home for weeks and months at a time, even if the animal is removed
  • Pet allergens travel easily through dust and on clothes, and can also be found in buildings and homes without pets
  • Pet allergens can trigger asthma in people with the condition

Symptoms of pet allergies:

  • Sneezing
  • Congestion and runny nose
  • Watery, itchy eyes
  • Rashes and skin irritation like eczema
  • Difficulty breathing
In some cases, allergy symptoms can linger for weeks or months at a time. Consult an ENT doctor for severe symptoms that persist or do not resolve with over the counter treatment.